By Cheryl L. Dorsey and Kathleen Kelly Janus, July 1, 2016

By Gabe Kleinman, June 24, 2016

By Tasbeeh Herwees, March 31, 2016

By Herman K. Trabish, March 28, 2016

By Natayla Savka, March 24, 2016

By Kevin Brehm and Joseph Goodman, March 22, 2016

February 4, 2016

By Zach Church, September 9, 2015

By Meteor BladesAugust 10, 2015 

By Important Media Cross-Post, August 10, 2015 

By Ben Schiller, August 6, 2015

By Janna Oberdorf, July 14, 2015

By Kathryn Lopez, July 9, 2015

By Cheryl Dorsey, June 23, 2015


By Steve Moilanen and Nathan Ratledge, December 15, 2015

"Community solar has evolved quickly since its inception just a few years ago. As the market matures, we see vast potential for a new application for the community solar model. We call it “company-sponsored solar.” The idea here is that corporations would own or sponsor a community solar array on behalf of their employees."

By Steve Moilanen, April 20, 2015

"Approximately three out of four households in the United States cannot install a solar array on their own property. And so if we believe that any household should have the opportunity to participate in renewable energy, then we need to create avenues for participation above and beyond rooftop solar. Solar crowdfunding can be just such an avenue."

By Brian Bowen and Vote Solar, March 13, 2015

"Community solar is on the move, and there is good reason for the momentum. By enabling customers to purchase, lease, or otherwise share the benefits of a portion of a local solar array, shared solar vastly expands the market for consumer-driven solar power. Despite rooftop solar’s impressive growth in recent years, the fact remains that nearly four out of five residents cannot install solar panels on their own roof due to financial, structural, or solar resource issues. A well-designed shared solar program breaks down those barriers and connects more Americans with the solar power they want."

By Brian Bowen and Vote Solar's Sean Garren, February 3, 2015

"It is no secret that the residential solar market is booming. And those of us with a passion for clean energy are more than happy to share the good news. But as we celebrate the extraordinary success of the solar industry, there is something missing from the conversation.  Specifically, how do we share the benefits of solar more equitably?  How do we ensure that solar is within reach of every American household, not just those who can afford to install panels on their rooftops? Put simply: We talk about 'grid parity,' but what about 'grid equality?'”